BACKYARD BROADCASTING, LOCAL NEWS SEPTEMBER 24, 2021

EXPLOSION SENDS DANVILLE WOMAN TO HOSPITAL

The Sunbury Daily Item reported a Danville woman went to the hospital after suffering injuries from an explosion at a welding shop yesterday afternoon in Mahoning Township.  According to Mahoning Township Police Chief Fred Dyroff, the explosion happened when Kathy Snyder was welding a diesel tank around 2pm.

KRAYNAK PLEAD GUILTY TO 12 FELONY COUNTS

Dr. Raymond Kraynak yesterday unexpectedly ended a four-year-long legal battle, by pleading guilty to 12 felony counts of illegal distribution or dispensing of prescription drugs. The plea was made 10 days into the trial in Williamsport. U.S. Judge Matthew Brann accepted the plea and Kraynak will be sentenced at a later date in federal court. As part of the plea deal, Kraynak is likely to face a maximum of 15 years in prison, a fine and probation to be determined, potential restitution to the victims and additional court fees and costs. Brann ordered a pre-sentence investigation and report before Kraynak is sentenced. According to the Daily Item, a sentencing date is not yet scheduled. Kraynak remains free on $500,000 bail until the sentencing date.

UPDATED COVID-19 LOCAL RESULTS

The Pennsylvania Department of Health on Thursday reported new COVID-19 cases statewide. In Clinton County 31 new cases were reported, Centre County saw an increase of 58, Lycoming County increased by 84, 48 cases in Northumberland County, 24 in Snyder, 14 in Union and three in Montour.

CLINTON COUNTY PRESIDENT JUDGE DENIES PARTS OF A PRE-TRIAL MOTION

Clinton County President Judge Craig Miller has denied nearly all parts of a pre-trial motion submitted by Jamie Lynn Jackson’s defense in an attempt to challenge evidence accusing her of killing her 9-year-old nephew. Jackson, 36, is accused of abusing Anson Stover and leaving him for dead in a bathtub in her home along East Bald Eagle Street in November 2020. She faces criminal homicide and six other charges by the Lock Haven City Police Department. According to a media outlet, Jackson’s trial is scheduled to begin on March 28, 2022, and may last until April 8, 2022. Jury selection will begin on March 21, 2022.

EVANGELICAL COMMUNITY HOSPITAL SALARY INCREASE

In what seems to be a step in the right direction, and after Geisinger announced a wage increase last week, the Evangelical Community Hospital announced this week approximately 700 employees will see an increase in their wages as the Hospital moves to make the minimum base pay for all positions $15 per hour. The new wages take affect October 3.  According to a media outlet, the Evangelical’s Vice President of People and Culture Rachel Smith says the increase shows commitment to being a strong employer of choice in the region, and the hospital’s desire to continually recruit high caliber individuals to be part of the healthcare environment.

STATE SENATOR GENE YAW SPEAKS UP FOR FIREFIGHTERS

The Senate this week approved a bill establishing statewide uniform requirements restricting the use of certain “Class B” firefighting foams for training purposes and testing, according to a press release. The legislation, known as the Firefighting Foam Management Act, would restrict the use of foam containing added (PFAS) beginning July 1, 2022. According to state Sen. Gene Yaw, Township, the bill’s prime sponsor, this bill will undoubtedly protect firefighters moving forward, while also safeguarding our ground and surface water from contamination.

SENTATE RESTRICTING USE OF CERTAIN “CLASS B” FOAM

The Senate this week approved a bill establishing statewide uniform requirements restricting the use of certain “Class B” firefighting foams for training purposes and testing, according to a press release. The bill would further direct the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency (PEMA), in consultation with the State Fire Commissioner, to assist firefighting entities with evaluating and determining how to transition to the use of class B firefighting foam that does not contain a PFAS chemical. Yaw indicated the legislation would not impact the continued use of firefighting foams during emergency situations.

SECOND ALARM FIRE IN WILLIAMSPORT

T&T Nail in the River Valley Plaza at 201 Basin St. was expected to remain closed at least two to three weeks after a smoldering electrical fire was discovered inside the business about 8:40 a.m. Thursday, according to city Platoon Chief Samuel Aungst. A fire that consumed a small cabinet filled with nail polish and nail removal was smoldering when firefighters arrived, Aungst said, adding that damage was estimated at about $25,000. No one was injured, and damage was limited to the one business. Both the woman and child were taken to Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, officials said.

MURDER TRIAL CONTINUES IN WILLIAMSPORT

The trial of Ikeem Fogan, a man accused of killing a Newberry woman in 2019, finished its final session of the week with testimony from forensic scientists and a member of the county sheriff’s office. Nicholas Plumley, a state police forensic scientist in Harrisburg, said his office found “gunshot residue” on Fogan’s hands or back.“Fogan may have recently handled or discharged a firearm,” Plumley told the jury. “He could have been near a discharged gun.” Fogan is accused of killing Rhonda McPeak in the Newberry Uni-Mart in August 2019 during a failed robbery. Police found and arrested him around 30 hours after the shooting occurred.

MONDAY WITNESSES PLAN FOR THE END OF THE TRIAL

The trial of Ikeem Fogan, a man accused of killing a Newberry woman in 2019, finished its final session of the week with testimony from forensic scientists and a member of the county sheriff’s office.On Monday, the jury will hear from the remainder of summoned witnesses, including DNA evidence, before both parties make their closing statements around noon. Then, the jury will deliberate through the rest of the day as long as it takes to reach a verdict.

PENNSYLVANIA TURNPIKE ALL-ELECTRONIC TOLLING

The Pennsylvania Turnpike’s switch to all-electronic tolling has been anything but quick or painless. In fact, an internal turnpike report was issued in July: that more than $104 million in tolls went uncollected last year. Some troubling facts, as reported in just one paragraph of a recent AP article: “Last year, license plates could not be identified in 1.8 million Pennsylvania Turnpike rides, bills were undeliverable in just over 1 million instances, and motor vehicle agencies failed to provide vehicle owner addresses more than 1.5 million times. An additional 6.7 million transactions were marked as ‘not paid.’ “

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