BACKYARD BROADCASTING LOCAL NEWS, SEPTEMBER 3, 2021

COAL TOWNSHIP BOARD TO APPEAL JUDGE’S DECISION

The Coal Township Board of Commissioners voted Thursday to appeal a county judge’s decision that forces the township to pay back more than $267,000 in disputed prison permit fees to Northumberland County. As reported by the Daily Item, the township has argued that the county’s lawsuit was premature, the county lacked jurisdiction and failed to follow the statutory conditions of an appeal, according to the township. The township commissioners said the prison was not a project they even wanted in Coal Township. “It’s a burden on our emergency services,” said Commissioner Craig Fetterman Fetterman. “They could have kept it in Sunbury and that would be fine with us.”

STUDENTS FAIL TO WEAR MASKS FOR INDOOR CONCERT AT BUCKNELL

According to Bucknell University, hundreds of students unmasked at a weekend show were in violation of university policy. An on-campus concert last weekend at the Gerhard Fieldhouse, originally set as an outdoor show, attracted up to 1,000 students. Mike Ferlazzo, Bucknell’s director of media relations, said masks were provided to every student who arrived without one of their own. According to the Daily Item, Ferlazzo went on to say “Based on attendees’ behavior at this indoor event, the status of future indoor student events is being evaluated.”

FATAL CRASH YESTERDAY NEAR HUGHESVILLE

The Lycoming County Coroner’s Office was called to Rt. #118 east of Hughesville at the intersection of Clarkstown Rd. for a MVC involving an SUV and Tractor Trailer Truck hauling milk.  The deceased was Harold Lowe who was traveling east turning onto Clarkstown Rd. when he was struck from behind.  Both operators were entrapped in the wreckage of their vehicles being extricated by Fire and EMS personnel from Hughesville and Muncy Fire Departments.  An autopsy is scheduled for Friday morning at 8 AM and State Police are continuing their investigation into the crash.  Additional information will be released as available.

COVID-19 DASHBOARD RESULTS FROM THURSDAY AT NOON

The Pennsylvania Department of Health Thursday confirmed that Clinton County saw 10 new cases of COVID-19  over the past 24 hours; Centre County went up 57; Lycoming County jumped by 61, Northumberland County 28, 13 new cases in Snyder County and 10 in Union County, according to a media outlet.

PEDESTRIAN STRUCK WITH VEHICLE FOLLOWING AN ARGUMENT

According to witnesses, a Chevrolet Uplander struck a woman after she had an argument with the driver. When South Williamsport Police arrived, they found a woman, who could not walk, complaining of leg pain.  According to police, Jason Moser, 40, Williamsport, allegedly struck the victim near 2688 Euclid Ave in Duboistown on Aug. 27.  Moser was charged with first-degree felony aggravated assault, first-degree misdemeanor simple assault, first-degree accidents involving death or personal injury, second-degree recklessly endangering another person, and a summary charge of harassment. Moser was held at the Lycoming County Prison in lieu of $25,000 monetary bail. According to northcentralpa.com,  Moser will meet with Judge William Solomon on Sept. 8 for a preliminary hearing.

STATE POLICE HOLIDAY ENFORCEMENT DUI ROVING PATROLS AND CHECKPOINTS

State Police from the Mansfield and Montoursville barracks will conduct DUI roving patrols and checkpoints over Labor Day weekend in Lycoming and Tioga counties, both barracks announced. The checkpoints will be targeting high DUI-related crash areas, according to compiled statistical data. According to the State Police, all motorists are reminded of the “Duty of Driver in Emergency Response Areas” law which states that drivers shall move over to an open lane and/or reduce speed when they see police stopped along the roadway with their emergency lights activated, or other emergency vehicles with their lights activated. State police reminds motorists to always wear their seat belts.

50TH ANNUAL JAYCEES LABOR DAY REGATTA

The rain and higher water brought by Tropical Storm Ida will not stop this weekend’s 50th Annual Jaycees Labor Day Regatta.Upwards of  300 boaters are expected to take to the waters of the West Branch Susquehanna starting Saturday.  Dave Breisacher, president of the Delaware Valley Outboard Racing Association, a sanctioning body of the competition along with the American Power Boat Association (APA), “As long as the river doesn’t crest too high, we should have a great weekend to race.” According to SUN Gazette, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) was predicting the river to crest to 10.7 feet Thursday night and that should allow the races to proceed.The opening ceremony is at 10 a.m. Saturday, with U.S. Rep. Fred Keller of the 12th District as speaker.

STATE SENATOR GENE YAW DISAPPOINTED OVER STATE PARTICIPATION

State Sen. Gene Yaw, spoke out this week against Gov. Tom Wolf’s mandate for the state to join the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. By a recent vote of 3-2, the Independent Regulatory Review Commission opened the door for the state to be part of the interstate initiative without legislative approval, according to Yaw, who serves as chair of the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee. As reported by a media outlet, the decision, he said, means the state loses control over its energy production, economic development, energy security and environmental protection. According to Yaw, “Moreover, Pennsylvania will lose thousands of skilled and good paying jobs and untold millions of dollars in its tax base for CO2 emissions reductions stated to be less than 1%.”

HIGH WATER DELAYS CAUSEWAY PROJECT

 It was a project approved in July that would create a causeway on Lycoming Creek for heavy equipment and trucks as part of the levee recertification. Now, following the remnants of Ida, and the high water levels, the project remains on hold. Williamsport  City Council authorized spending $36,941 and approved the contract for Earthwork Services of Danville to do work that can only be completed when the creek level is lower, this according to Jon Sander, city engineer, who went on to say, “It’s an important project for levee stability.” According to SUN Gazette, once the creek is at a low level, the project is expected to take three to four days to complete.

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